Relations between combat sport and real combat

Combat sports is often derived from Martial Arts in accent, as the man himself, “who is stronger” quest by setting contest rules: Olympic Judo, Kosen Judo, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, and SAMBO are all fighting sports that derived from original Kodokan Judo martial art.

In rare cases sport combat style may not be based on any martial art – one (and may be the only) example is Greek-Roman Olympic Wrestling.

To compare fighting power of a combat sport to its precursor martial art is meaningless as it’s always just a subset of original, shaped by the contest rules. In the real fight good master of any martial art based sport combat expects to resort to full pour of the original Art.

Does it mean that training in sport version of the Art is not needed if you can train in Art itself?

When Dr. Kano started his Kodokan Judo in 1882 it was about 300 styles and schools of jujutsu in Japan. The question is why he did it? And why his Judo survived and flourishing all across the World when out of those 300 only a dozen still alive and no one even close to Word-wide proliferation of Judo?

The answer to this question (by my humble opinion) is that Dr. Kano included sporting component into Judo what differentiate it from other jujutsu styles.

Adding sporting dimension to Judo in addition to randori training added new qualities to Judo combat training and allowed to sustain high quality training in a peace time, witch was a problem for traditional jujutsu as, without constant battle proving, kata-only trained techniques tend to loose their effectiveness.



What is the best combat sport for self-defense training?

Sport, combat, and self-defense

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